Education,

We Must Stop Promoting Conference Fast-Track, Artificial, Butt-In-Seat, Surface Learning

How are your conference attendees learning?
 
Yes, of course we should ask, “What are they learning?” More importantly, we need to ask, “How are they learning?”
 
We’ve got to confront the ineffectiveness of our conference education approaches! We must begin to offer effective alternatives to the traditional “sit and get” lecture.

LEGO Serious Play

We experienced at The FRESH Conference how LEGO can be a great and engaging tool to facilitate the learning. And LEGO® Serious Play® programs are being used by companies worldwide that are looking for innovative ways to increase the commitment, confidence and insight of their executives, managers and employees.

Unlearning Our Old Patterns Of Conference Education To Relearn ...

It’s past time for conference organizers to learn about learning! Our conference success depends upon it.

We’ve got to stop saying that it is someone else’s job to manage the content, programming and the attendee experience of the conference. That all we do is work on the logistics of the conference.

Is Your Conference Fostering Conscious Cognitive Misers?

Are you creating intellectually lazy conference participants?  Your conference programming may harbor bias toward minimizing cognitive efforts. In other words, your conference sessions and speakers may actual curtail participants’ thinking. Your conference could be creating happy fools. These happy fools blindly respond to their own problems by erroneously using your conference takeaways as accurate solutions. They avoid thinking, reflecting, and adapting those takeaways. Then when your conference takeaways don’t work, they blame your event.

Seeing is not remembering, it turns out

People may have to 'turn on' their memories in order to remember even the simplest details of an experience, according to psychologists. This finding, which has been named 'attribute amnesia,' indicates that memory is far more selective than previously thought. "It is commonly believed that you will remember specific details about the things you're attending to, but our experiments show that this is not necessarily true," said Brad Wyble, assistant professor of psychology.

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